Household heating costs are expected to be lower than previous two winters 

Most U.S. households can expect lower heating expenditures this winter (October through March) compared with the past two winters. In most regions, the decline in expenditures is attributed to the combination of warmer weather and lower fuel prices.According to EIA's Winter Fuels Outlook, average household expenditures for homes heating primarily with natural gas will total … Continue reading Household heating costs are expected to be lower than previous two winters 

Supreme Court Review of Demand Response

Demand response (DR) is a critically important tool for creating a more flexible power grid.  The Department of Energy recently concluded that DR can enable greater deployment of renewables and reduce new transmission investment.  The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) reported that DR lowers wholesale power prices and enhances reliability during extreme weather.  New market … Continue reading Supreme Court Review of Demand Response

NextEra on Storage: ‘Post 2020, There May Never Be Another Peaker Built in the US’

Energy storage at utility scale just got a $100M vote of confidence from one of the world's largest utilities. NextEra Energy wants to be "the largest, most profitable clean energy provider in the United States," according to Jim Robo, CEO of the utility giant, at an analyst conference at Wolfe Research in New York on … Continue reading NextEra on Storage: ‘Post 2020, There May Never Be Another Peaker Built in the US’

Proposed Clean Power Plan rule cuts power sector CO2 emissions to lowest level since 1980s

In June 2014, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a rule to regulate carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from existing power plants under section 111(d) of the Clean Air Act. EIA's newly released analysis of the proposed rule shows power sector CO2 emissions falling to about 1,500 million metric tons per year by 2025, a … Continue reading Proposed Clean Power Plan rule cuts power sector CO2 emissions to lowest level since 1980s

Power generation from coal and natural gas expected to temporarily converge this spring

EIA's most recent Short-Term Energy Outlook forecasts that the amount of electricity generation fueled by natural gas in April and May will total just 3.5% less than the projected amount of coal-fired generation. This convergence has occurred only once before, in April 2012, when natural gas fueled just 1.5% less generation than coal. Power generation … Continue reading Power generation from coal and natural gas expected to temporarily converge this spring

Smart Wires Clears Congestion and Allows More Renewables on the Transmission Grid : Greentech Media

Transmission grids are one of the biggest bottlenecks to growing the world’s share of wind and solar power. Transmission networks built to push power from central power plants at steady outputs, along undisturbed paths, aren’t well suited for cutting back or increasing throughput to match the intermittent generation coming from big wind and solar farms. … Continue reading Smart Wires Clears Congestion and Allows More Renewables on the Transmission Grid : Greentech Media

Electricity’s Un-Natural Monopoly

The U.S. electricity system is undergoing the biggest change in its 130-year history, undermining the rationale for monopoly ownership and control. Until recently, electricity service was similar to water or roads, where a natural monopoly was most efficient. Only a single, standardized electric grid was needed to connect each building. Technology options were limited to … Continue reading Electricity’s Un-Natural Monopoly

Norwegian green energy to power UK homes

Green power from Norway will be powering hundreds of thousands of UK homes from 2021, National Grid has said. Energy will travel via the world's longest sub-sea electricity interconnector. The €2bn (£1.4bn) project has been rubber stamped between National Grid and its Norwegian equivalent Statnett. The UK aims to import enough hydro-power from Norway to … Continue reading Norwegian green energy to power UK homes

How and why utilities make solar look expensive

The utility’s 2014 resource plan suggests that it hasn’t grasped (or refuses to seize) the opportunity. Although they forecast growth in renewable energy by 600 megawatts (MW) in the next 15 years, it’s only half the capacity increase they intend for natural gas (1200 MW). Why short-change solar? It’s pretty easy when you dramatically exaggerate its cost. … Continue reading How and why utilities make solar look expensive